Tea with Jane Austen

December 21, 2013 - Comment

Who would not want to sit down with Jane Austen and join her in a cup of tea? Here for the first time is a book that shares the secrets of one of her favorite rituals.Tea figures prominently in Jane Austen’s life and work. At the center of almost every social situation in her novels

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Who would not want to sit down with Jane Austen and join her in a cup of tea? Here for the first time is a book that shares the secrets of one of her favorite rituals.
Tea figures prominently in Jane Austen’s life and work. At the center of almost every social situation in her novels one finds tea. In Emma, does Miss Bates drink coffee? Of course not: ‘No coffee, I thank you, for me-never take coffee.-A little tea if you please.’ In Pride and Prejudice, what is one of the supreme honors Mr. Collins can envision Lady Catherine bestowing on Elizabeth Bennet and her friends? Why, drinking tea with her, naturally.
Tea with Jane Austen begins with tea drinking in the morning and ends with tea in the evening, at balls and other gatherings. Each chapter includes a description of how tea was taken at a particular place or time of day, along with history, recipes, excerpts from Austen’s novels and letters and illustrations from the time.

Comments

A. Woodley "Patroness, Janeites, the Austen list" says:

Short and punchy book for tea drinkers and Janeites This is a lovely short little book which will not only teach you how to make a good cup of tea but at the same time takes a lovely cultural walk through the historical significance of tea both in society and literature.The Georgian era really saw the rise in tea as a social institution, which is of course the time of Austen. Kim Wilson manages to extract references to tea in novels and letters using them as examples of its importance at the time, and its use as a literary…

A reader in Wisconsin says:

Highly recommended Before sitting down with this book, turn to the very last chapter, which explains how to make the perfect cup of tea — and prepare a whole pot for yourself. Because once you begin reading Kim Wilson’s engaging discussion, you’ll want nothing so much as a good cup of tea (except, perhaps, a rout cake or Bath bun to go with it) but will not want to put the book down long enough to boil water. “Tea with Jane Austen” is like the best blends of the beverage, its individual components smoothly…

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